Citizens' Radioactivity Measuring Station

Citizen's Radioactivity Measuring Station (CRMS) is a Fukushima based laboratory which conduct a constant radioactive monitoring of food, water and soil. The station publishes the results of the measurements on their website.

Announcement from CRMS about the Use of the Name (October 3, 2013)

Announcement from the Citizens Radioacti
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Our Achieves on CRMS

Wed

20

Nov

2013

おたずねポスト第7回 CRMSに聞いてみよう(No.2) : セシウムだけ測定している厚労省の食品中の放射能測定の発表は、内部被曝を避ける指針になりますか。

ゲルマニウム半導体測定器(写真はキャンベラ社製)
ゲルマニウム半導体測定器(写真はキャンベラ社製)

しばらくぶりの更新になりました「おたずねポスト」第7回。今回は「CRMSに聞いてみよう」です。「放射能から子どもたちを守る世界ネットワーク」のメンバーも、原発事故後の様々な情報、とくに放射能の測定に関する話題には敏感になっています。しかし、「放射能測定」といってもいまいちよくわからないところがたくさんあります。福島市にある市民放射能測定所CRMSの岩田氏に、ゲルマニウム半導体測定器(注)を使った測定に関して質問しました。

 

(注)ゲルマニウム半導体測定器の機械の説明は、以下のサイトなどをご覧下さい。

Wikipedia

★日本の環境放射能と放射線(公益財団法人 日本分析センター※)ウェブサイト

http://www.kankyo-hoshano.go.jp/kl_db/servlet/com_s_index

内部にある環境放射能用語集にゲルマニウム半導体測定器の説明があります。

 

※環境放射能/放射線に関する分析専門機関として1974年に設立。上記ホームページは,原子力規制庁の委託により日本分析センターが運営管理している(日本分析センターHPより)

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Fri

27

Sep

2013

The 3rd Citizen-Scientist International Symposium on Radiation Protection, October 13 and 14

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Tue

23

Apr

2013

CRMS releases the analysis report of the entire measurement results

The following is the press release by CRMS which covers the whole research they undertook since July 2011 based on the radioactive monitoring of 6886 food samples. A brief analysis of the research can be found on the bottom of this article. However, the detailed results are only available in Japanese, which is on this page.

 

What are the actual measurements of radioactive substances in Japanese foods after one year from the revision of government safety criteria?


Citizens' Radioactivity Measuring Station (CRMS; Executive Director: Aya Marumori) has rounded up measurement results of radioactive contamination taken mainly in Fukushima Prefecture after the accident at Tokyo Electric Power Company's (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

 

After 12 March 2011, people living in Japan have been left with no choice but to find ways to live with radiation contamination. Even under the international consensus regarding radiation exposure, there is no threshold that guarantees safety. Each individual must now be aware and do whatever possible to avoid and reduce exposure. Even at this point, we can confirm that radiation has spread not only within the area surrounding the nuclear plant, but it has also spread across prefecture, city and town borders, making it difficult for the various administrations in these areas to handle the matter adequately on their own.

 

Considering such situation, CRMS has operated as an independent organization that provides individuals with tools that help them measure radiation on their own and learn about radiation protection in order to protect themselves.

 

In our latest data analyses by March 10th of 2013, 1.25% of the entire items measured exceeded the threshold of 500Bq/kg, which was the government's provisional criterion set right after the accident. When the threshold level was revised to 100Bq/kg in April 2012, the percentage of those that exceeded the new criteria rose to 6.56%. In the same manner, the percentage rose to 12.72% at 50Bq/kg; 35.25% at 10Bq/kg; 42.51% at 5Bq/kg. Radioactive Cesium was detected in 49.6% from 6889 samples.

 

For more details, please refer to the summary of results in the following page. We have also attached a separate sheet showing details of the measurement analyses. (Only available in Japanese).

 

Now that we are able to offer our latest measurement results, we hope that members of the press will make further efforts to report about the effects of the nuclear accident, considering the fact that in the past two years the general public have become less interested in the issue.

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Mon

22

Apr

2013

Radioactive mud in Fukushima school pools tops 100,000Bq

Radioactive cesium levels exceeding 100,000 becquerels per kilogram were measured in mud accumulated at the bottom of swimming pools at two high schools in and around Fukushima city.

 

Mud in the pool of a third high school in Minami-Soma, which is closer to the crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant, showed at least 8,000 becquerels per kilogram.

 

Under a special measures law, the central government must remove mud and other substances with radioactivity levels of more than 8,000 becquerels caused by the meltdowns at the plant.

 

The three high schools have not discharged the water from their swimming pools since the nuclear crisis started on March 11, 2011. The water has apparently blocked the spread of contamination from the mud; air radiation levels near the three school pools are almost the same as those of other locations.

 

“Mud under the water, even if highly contaminated, would not become an issue unless it was taken out of the water,” said Kunikazu Noguchi, an associate professor of radiation protection at Nihon University.

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Mon

24

Dec

2012

Hot spots around the school and protective measures distributed to Oguni Elementary School

Measuring the level of radiation by the school yard
Measuring the level of radiation by the school yard

Investigation by CRMS Citizen's Radioactivity Measuring Station and its protective measures taken

 

On Sunday July 8, 2012 from 1 to 4 PM, a local group called "the Association to Restore Clean Oguni from Radioactive Contamination" and a few members of the Parent-Teacher Association took radiation readings around the school. The survey confirmed the effect of the decontamination work done on the school ground. However, the survey also found hot spots scattered around, including the school bus boarding area and from there to the main gate of the school, alongside the school ground, south and east sides of the swimming pool, and behind the gymnasium. In order to ensure the safety, bamboo sticks wrapped around in red tape were put up at these locations, and the students were warned not to go near them.

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Wed

19

Dec

2012

The Condition of the Specific Spots Recommended for Evacuation

Two monitoring posts facing each other at Oguni Primary School
Two monitoring posts facing each other at Oguni Primary School

'Specific Spots Recommended for Evacuation (SSRE)' was set on June 16, 2011 referring to the areas which contain high radioactive contamination, including numerous hot spots. The defined level of radiation in the SSRE suggests the cumulative dose equivalent to 20mSv/y or higher. Unlike the Mandatory Evacuation Zone, the government support for evacuees from the SSRE is only provided for individual household units according to the radiation dose measured on their property. This means some households are not able to be evacuated while, in some cases, their neighbours are encouraged to do so. Those areas which implement the recommended evacuation over individual households are considered as SSRE such as Date City and some parts of Minami-Soma City.

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