Fri

17

Jan

2014

“I felt that the government had abandoned us” : A high school girl left her hometown in Ibaraki, for her future after the nuclear disaster

「政府は私たちを見捨てたんだって感じました」:移住した女子学生のメッセージ

Voices of Nuclear Migrants, Vol.6
Voices of Nuclear Migrants, Vol.6

The following text is extracted from Voices of Nuclear Migrants; HOME Vol.2. (edited by Shou Kamihara). 

Each volume of Voices of Nuclear Migrants consists of interviews of and messages from people who left their home and homeland because of the on-going nuclear crisis, and Kamihara’s short story based on the stories of the nuclear migrants to whom he connected. Kamihara has published six volumes of Voices of Nuclear migrants so far and they are available for purchasing online here (the boolkets are available in Japanese only). 

 

WNSCR has translated one of the interviews from the booklet (Vol. 2). The interviewee is a high school girl who left her hometown for Hokkaido, the northern island of Japan.  She moved to Hokkaido for a fresh start as a high school student.

 

Please read the past articles about Kamihara's work in our website. 

Kamihara's message

A chapter from his book 'Fleeing from Fukushima' 

Short poem on the lives of nuclear migrants.

 

 

 

以下の文章は、神原将編集の小冊子「移住者の声 HOME 第2号」より抜粋しました。「移住者の声」は原発事故を機に家族移住や母子避難をした人々の声を集め、神原氏の短いエッセイ、移住者の体験に基づいた創作ストーリーとともに小冊子にまとめたものです。2012年より数ヶ月おきに1号ずつ出て、6号まで出ています(日本語のみ)。

 

「移住者の声」編集にあたっての神原氏のメッセージ(「移住者の声 第3号」より抜粋)

 

「日本人にはとても素晴らしい、相手を思いやる気持ち、人情というものがあります。東日本大震災と原発事故の被害は世界でも類を見ない過酷なものでした。しかし、だからといって、事実を覆い隠したり、後世に伝えないようにしてしまえば、再び同様の災害が起きてしまった時に、子どもや孫の世代は、知恵を与えられず、同じ苦境に追いやられてしまうでしょう。

だから、たとえ辛いことであっても、記録し、表現し、伝えて残すことが大切なのです。そこから学んで、この先の生き方に繋げていくやり方が、この地球上の生き物のなかで、私たち人間だけに与えられた、唯一の能力ではないでしょうか。

見ざる、聞かざる、言わざる、ではいけないということです。見て、聞いて、伝えることが大切なのです。」

 

子ども世界ネットでは、この冊子の第2号に収められた事故当時中学生、現在は高校生の女の子へのアンケートとメッセージを翻訳しました。日本語ではメッセージのみを掲載いたします。

 

「移住者の声」の購入はこちらのサイトからどうぞ。

神原氏の著作「原発引っ越し」に関する子ども世界ネットの過去の記事はこちら

  

Question 1. Basic information (Name, previous and current residence, occupation and family members)

 

Name: Mika

 

Previous address: Chikusei City, Ibaraki prefecture

Current address: Ebetsu City, Hokkaido

 

Previous Occupation: Middle school student

Current occupation: High school student

 

Family members: Father, mother, older brother, older sister, grandfather, grandmother

 

Current situation of the family: My brother was studying at his university’s Hokkaido campus during the year of the earthquake. My sister is currently studying in Mito-city, Ibaraki pref. The other family members live in Ibaraki, running a family business.

 

Q2. Why did you move?

 

My parents understood the danger of radiation.

 

Q3. Were there any problems or issues for moving?

 

It took me 1 year because I took the entrance exam to enter a high school in Hokkaido*. Right after the earthquake I fled to Hokkaido with my mother and my siblings and we then stayed there for 1 month.

 

*In Japan students are admitted to high school by passing an entrance examination prior to April ,the new term of a year in Japan. (* by WNSCR) 

 

Q4. Were there any problems or issues in connection with the move?

 

I didn’t like my friends asking me, ‘’Why do you go to Hokkaido?”, as if it was a subject for gossip.

 

Q5. How did you choose the place for your new place to stay? What influenced your choice?

 

My father has a friend in Hokkaido and he helped us during our first stay in Hokkaido, for one month after the nuclear accident. He is going to help us in the future, too. If the place where we are going to live will accept radioactive debris from Tohoku, we will move on to New Zealand.

 

Q6. Were there problems and issues that you had to address after moving?

 

I was concerned that I might have been discriminated against because of my radiation exposure, but people here do not know much about radiation and I made many friends! I feel relieved. I am worried about the food and the air, but I feel much better now, compared to how I felt in Ibaraki.

 

Q7. What were the negative aspects of your moving?

 

The moving hasn’t had any negative impact. The advantage is that I feel good and I’ve made new friends.

 

Q8. Were there any changes in your work/occupation?

 

I feel as if I just went to school far away, because I moved there at the time when I was admitted to high school.

 

Q9. What do you think would have happened, if you had remained in Kanto?

 

After some time, say 5 to 10 years, many people around me would be dead, including myself!

 

Q10. Please tell me about your prediction about possible outcomes of radiation influence on the health.

 

According to a German media report, I have heard that 60% of the population in Kanto and Tohoku is going to be dead within 5 years. 40% of the rest of the population will get sick because of radiation. 80% of the children now won’t be able to live until age 40. Among children who are to be born in the future, only 15% will be born healthy.

 

Q11. How do you feel about the current government/municipal policies and treatment for radiation and earthquake?

 

I think the people in the government love money more than our lives. They are not human anymore.

 

Q12. What do you think about people who still live in Kanto?

 

I don’t know if they are ignorant of the facts, or if they have just given up on their lives, but I think they are going to die. We cannot survive unless we look up information by ourselves.

 

Q13. How have the 3.11 disaster and the influence of radiation afterward changed your life and your view about life?

 

I had never thought that Japan could be so insane.

 

Q14. Do you have any message?

 

Under the current situation, if we want to live for the future, we have to take action right away. I hope my words can push someone else back and help them to make a decision.

From this spring I shall go to high school in Hokkaido! I had been evacuated for one month since March 15, 2011. My father’s friend hosted us.

 

During the time I was evacuated, I was living in Ibaraki. There I was attending middle school, where I was playing softball in a school club. Softball was everything for me in my school life, so I was so disappointed that I couldn’t even eat or go out while we were in Hokkaido. I was so sad and was in pain, but I couldn’t cry.

 

My heart was really broken in pain. The choice to go to a local school was not an option after the nuclear accident. I thought we were going to Hokkaido. It was painful to hear my friends and teachers asking me, “why will you go to Hokkaido?”. But now when I see people’s comments on twitter, I wonder, “why don’t you all flee?”

 

My dream now is to live longer than my parents, who spent so much money to help me flee away.

What I most want to say is that, after the nuclear accident, my school distributed notes about the origins of the food they used for school lunch and I found on the note that most of the food originated from the Kanto area, sometimes even from Fukushima. I felt that the government had abandoned us. I didn’t want to see my friends eating the food.

 

 

 

質問11 自由にメッセージをお書きください。

 

もしも未来を生きたいなら、今すぐ手をうたないと生きていけない時代です。私の文字で誰かの背中が押せればいいなと思います。

 

今年の春(二○一二年春)から入学すると同時に、北海道の高校に疎開します! 三月十五日から約一か月、北海道の知り合いの家に兄弟と母と疎開してました。

 

疎開した時、私はソフトボール部に入っていて、在住していたのが茨城なんですけど、私は学校にはソフトボールをするために行っていたようなものなので、とってもくやしくて、北海道の食事もほとんど食べられなくて、家からも出られなくて、悲しくて、辛くて、でも泣けませんでした。

 

気持ちは、ほんとに辛かったです。進路は原発事故が起きてから地元の高校という選択肢はなくなりました。北海道に行くんだと思いました。「なんで北海道行くの?」という同級生や先生の声がつらかったです。でも今は、みなさんのツイッターの声を聞いて「なんで逃げないの?」って思います。

 

今の私の夢は、両親が私のために多額のお金をかけて逃がしてくれたので、両親より長生きすることです!

 

個人的に話したいことは給食の時、原発事故が起きてからは、使われる食材がどこ産かが分かるプリントが配られて、食品のほとんどが関東産だったことです。なかには福島産のものもあり、政府は私たちを見捨てたんだって感じました。それを食べる友だちも見たくなかった。

 

(Translation from Japanese to English by WNSCR team) 

Write a comment

Comments: 1
  • #1

    Herbert (Monday, 27 January 2014 16:54)

    If you want to know what has happened (confirmed by those who have build FDNPP) here it is:

    http://www.jimstonefreelance.com/fukushima1.html

    http://www.brookings.edu/research/articles/2008/01/28-asia-iwashita

    TEPCO, your Government are nuclear blackmailed and if they do not do, what the zionists want, they, the zionists, will blow up the nuclear powerplants in Japan, because all of them are compromised by Stuxnet and gun type nuclear bombs.
    It is realy absolut sad.
    Ask yourself, why suddenly Japan changed its mind and instead of having an association with the SCO there are now negotiations to join the Transpacific Partnership (TPP).
    That is why your government seems to react irrationally. Make shure to read the links and spread the word - otherwise Japan is lost.